Tolkien Society Meetings 2001-2005

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SPRING, 2001

January 21, 2001 — Patricia McKillip, THE TOWER AT STONY WOOD

February 18, 2001 — DUNE

Discussion of the DUNE mini-series on the Sci Fi Channel (2000), the David Lynch DUNE movie (1984), and the novel by Frank Herbert (1965).

March 18, 2001– VERNOR VINGE

Vinge will be one of the guests of honor at Odyssey Con in Madison (March 30-April 1, 2001). Discussion will focus on his novel, A FIRE UPON THE DEEP.

April 8, 2001 — J. R. R. TOLKIEN: AUTHOR OF THE CENTURY

We will use as our focus the book by Tom Shippey, J. R. R. TOLKIEN: AUTHOR OF THE CENTURY, to be published by Houghton Mifflin in April. The British edition was published last year.

May 13, 2001 — NANCY KRESS

Nancy Kress will be guest of honor at WisCon in Madison on Memorial Day weekend. We plan to concentrate on PRINCE OF MORNING BELLS, but any of her books may be discussed.

Summer, 2001

JUNE 17, 2001 — H. RIDER HAGGARD

           Sir Henry Rider Haggard is best-known for his novels KING SOLOMON’S MINES (1885) and SHE (1886).  He wrote many sequels to both, such as ALLAN QUARTERMAIN (1887) and WISDOM’S DAUGHTER (1923), even bringing these two major characters together in SHE AND ALLAN (1920).  Another novel of interest to fans of fantasy is one dealing with Odysseus and Helen after the fall of Troy: THE WORLD’S DESIRE (1890), written in collaboration with Andrew Lang (reissued in the Ballantine Adult Fantasy series in 1972).

           For background, consult Morton Cohen, RIDER HAGGARD: HIS LIFE AND WORKS (Hutchinson, 1960) or Norman Etherington, RIDER  HAGGARD (Twayne, 1984).  C. S. Lewis wrote a review-essay on Cohen’s book called “Haggard Rides Again” for TIME AND TIDE, most easily found reprinted (under the title “The Mythopoeic Gift of Rider Haggard”) in his collection ON STORIES AND OTHER ESSAYS ON LITERATURE, ed. Walter Hooper (Harcourt, Brace, Jovanovich, 1982) pp. 97-100.

           Jared Lobdell argues for Haggard’s influence on Tolkien in his book ENGLAND AND ALWAYS: TOLKIEN’S WORLD OF THE RINGS (Eerdmans, 1981), and William H. Green does so even more forcefully in his essay “King Thorin’s Mines: THE HOBBIT as Victorian Adventure Novel,” EXTRAPOLATION v. 42, no. 1 (Spring, 2001), pp. 57-64.   Check them out and see if they persuade you!

JULY 15, 2001 — JULES VERNE

There has been an immense amount written about Verne, both in French and English.  See Edward Gallagher, JULES VERNE: A PRIMARY AND SECONDARY BIBLIOGRAPHY (G. K. Hall, 1980). A good introduction is JULES VERNE AND HIS WORK by I. O. Evans (Arco, 1965).  His grandson, Jean Jules-Verne, wrote JULES VERNE: A BIOGRAPHY (English translation, Taplinger, 1976).  See also THE JULES VERNE ENCYCLOPEDIA by Brian Taves and Stephen Michaluk, Jr., with Edward Baxter (Scarecrow Press, 1996).  Arthur B. Evans has written many informative essays, such as “The Illustrators of Jules Verne’s Voyages Extraordinaires,” SCIENCE FICTION STUDIES v. 25, no. 2, whole no. 75 (July, 1998), pp. 291-270. 

           There have been numerous adaptations in movies and on television.  See Thomas C. Renzi, JULES VERNE ON FILM: A FILMOGRAPHY OF THE CINEMATIC ADAPTATIONS OF HIS WORKS, 1902 THROUGH 1997 (McFarland, 1998).  We might also consider THE SECRET ADVENTURES OF JULES VERNE, a series on the Sci-Fi channel (which perhaps owes more to THE AVENGERS and THE WILD, WILD WEST than to Verne!).

AUGUST 12 — COMPUTER ANIMATION

Kristin Thompson will lead the discussion.  We’ll use the new movie SHREK as our focus, so everyone should try to see it beforehand.

Fall, 2001

SEPTEMBER 9, 2001 — TOLKIEN AFTER ALL THESE YEARS

Reading (by gracious permission of the author) of a preprint of Douglas A. Anderson’s essay on “Tolkien After All These Years,” to be published in MEDITATIONS ON MIDDLE-EARTH, ed. Karen Haber (St. Martin’s Press, November, 2001).

OCTOBER 7, 2001 — THE FANTASY OF POUL ANDERSON

Discussion of the works of fantasy of the late author, rather than of his science fiction, including: THE BROKEN SWORD (1954, 1971), THREE HEARTS & THREE LIONS (1961), A MIDSUMMER TEMPEST (1975), WAR OF THE GODS (1997), OPERATION CHAOS (1971) and OPERATION LUNA (1999), et al.

NOVEMBER 4, 2001 — FAVORITE FANTASY

Discussion of MY FAVORITE FANTASY STORY (DAW, 2000), ed. Martin H. Greenberg, in which a number of fantasists choose a favorite story and explain why.

DECEMBER 9, 2001 — SARANTINE MOSAIC

Discussion of Guy Gavriel Kay’s SAILING TO SARANTIUM (1998) and LORD OF EMPERORS (2000).

Spring, 2002

JANUARY 13, 2002 — THE FELLOWSHIP OF THE RING

Discussion of the movie directed by Peter Jackson, which opened nationwide on Dec. 19, 2001.  Consider also Jude Fisher, THE LORD OF THE RINGS: THE FELLOWSHIP OF THE RING VISUAL COMPANION and Brian Sibley, THE LORD OF THE RINGS OFFICIAL MOVIE GUIDE, both published by Houghton Mifflin in late 2001.

FEBRUARY 17, 2002 — C. S. LEWIS: THE MAGIC NEVER ENDS

We may be able to get a room in Vilas Hall for this, or meet in the home of a member.  Discussion of THE MAGIC NEVER ENDS: THE LIFE AND WORK OF C. S. LEWIS, narrated by Ben Kingsley.  This hour-long documentary is to be shown nationwide on PBS stations beginning in January, but has already been televised in some places (e.g., Chicago).  It is available commercially on videotape.

MARCH 24, 2002 — OSCAR TELECAST

We had scheduled a discussion of  A. Merritt, but postponed that to June 16 so that we could gather at Kristin Thompson’s house and watch the Oscar telecast. THE LORD OF THE RINGS: THE FELLOWSHIP OF THE RING was nominated in 14 categories and won four.

APRIL 14, 2002 — DISNEY CENTENARY

Discussion of Walt Disney’s movies on the occasion of his centenary, focusing on his studio’s adaptations of fairy tales and other fantasy-related films.  Tolkien very much disliked the Disney touch: why, and do you think he was justified or not?

MAY 12, 2002 — BROWN GIRL IN THE RING

Discussion of the first novel by Nalo Hopkinson, BROWN GIRL IN THE RING (1998).  She is one of the guests of honor at WisCon on May 24-27, 2002.  Her fiction makes use of Caribbean folklore.

Summer, 2002

JUNE 16, 2002 — A. MERRITT

This topic was postponed from the March 24th meeting.  As part of our ongoing series on older authors, we will discuss the work of pulp author and editor Abraham Merritt (1882-1943).  BURN, WITCH, BURN (1933) was made into THE DEVIL DOLL (1936), a movie directed by Tod Browning.  Other major works include THE MOON POOL (1919) [an electronic version is available in NetLibrary; this can be accessed from MadCat, the online catalogue of the campus libraries], SHIP OF ISHTAR (1926), SEVEN FOOTPRINTS TO SATAN (1928), THE FACE IN THE ABYSS (1931), DWELLERS IN THE MIRAGE (1932), and CREEP, SHADOW, CREEP (1943).  There is a collection of shorter works in FOX WOMAN AND OTHER STORIES (1949). Starmont published a guide on A. MERRITT (1989) by Ronald Foust.  Sam Moskowitz devotes chapter 12 of his book EXPLORERS OF THE INFINITE: SHAPERS OF SCIENCE FICTION (World, 1963) to “The Marvellous A. Merritt” and also wrote a longer study, A. MERRITT: REFLECTIONS IN THE MOON POOL: A BIOGRAPHY (Oswald Train, 1985).

JULY 7, 2002 — DINOTOPIA

Discussion of the work of James Gurney, including DINOTOPIA: A LAND PART FROM TIME (1992), DINOTOPIA: THE WORLD BENEATH (1995), and DINOTOPIA: FIRST FLIGHT (1999).  Donald Dale Jackson has a profile of Gurney in the September, 1995 issue of Smithsonaian Magazine

      Gurney has allowed a number of other writers to set novels in Dinotopia.  Alan Dean Foster has two novels for adult readers, DINOTOPIA LOST (1996) and HAND OF DINOTOPIA (1999).  There are also several shorter works for children: Scott Ciencin’s LOST CITY (1995), WINDCHASER (1995), THUNDER FALLS (1996), SKY DANCE (1999), and THE EXPLORERS (2001); Peter David’s THE MAZE (1999); FIRESTORM (1997) by Wisconsin’s own Gene DeWeese; RESCUE PARTY (1999) by Mark A. Garland; CHOMPER (2000) by Donald F. Glut; HATCHLING (1995) by Midori Snyder; SURVIVE (2001) by Brad Strickland; and John Vornholt’s RIVER QUEST (1996), SABERTOOTH MOUNTAIN (1996), and DOLPHIN WATCH (2002).  None of these are illustrated by Gurney.

         A 6-hour mini-series (or “mega-series” as it was advertised) set in present-day Dinotopia was broadcast last May 12-14, the pilot for a television series to debut this fall.  There are numerous magazine articles relating to this, including three in Starlog no. 299 (June, 2002) (one is an interview with Gurney).    

There is a website at http://www.dinotopia.com

AUGUST 11, 2002 — NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC VIDEO ON TOLKIEN

          This meeting will be at the home of Kristin Thompson.  Consult a member for directions.

Fall, 2002

SEPTEMBER 8 — TOLKIEN & THE KALEVALA       

A paper by Richard C. West on “Setting the Rocket Off in Story: Tolkien and The Kalevala“.  At an early age, J. R. R. Tolkien was deeply impressed by the Finnish language and by Elias Lonnrot’s compilation of the folklore and myths of his country in The Kalavala.  Tolkien set out to retell the story of Kullervo from the Finnish epic, but this grew enormously in the telling, and became radically transformed into the tale of Turin Turambar.  He said later that it was this experience that “set the rocket off in story.”  This paper examines the influence of the Finnish Kalevala on the stories (such as those of Turin and of Beren & Luthien) that became the centerpieces of Tolkien’s legendarium and shaped the development of his own “mythology for England.”  [This essay was later published in Tolkien and the Invention of Myth, ed. Jane Chance, University Press of Kentucky, 2004.]

OCTOBER 6, 2002 — A TRIBUTE TO CHUCK JONES

           Kristin Thompson will lead a memorial discussion of the great cartoonist and filmmaker, who died earlier this year.  He wrote two autobiographies, Chuck Amuck (1989; this is also the title of a documentary on his career, available on video) and Chuck Reducks (1996).  His cartoons include numerous Warner Bros. shorts (featuring Bugs Bunny, Daffy Duck, Road Runner, et al.), How the Grinch Stole Christmas, The Phantom Tollbooth, and adaptations of Rudyard Kipling (such as Rikki-Tikki-Tavi and The White Seal).  PBS stations will be televising Chuck Jones: Extremes and In-Betweens: A Life in Animation this fall.  Madison’s PBS station is scheduled to show this on Wednesday, September 25, 9:30 to 11:00 p.m., repeated on Saturday, September 28, 11:00 p.m. to 12:30 a.m.

NOVEMBER 17, 2002 — AMERICAN GODS

Discussion of Neil Gaiman’s novel American Gods (2001).

DECEMBER 15, 2002 — THE ANNOTATED HOBBIT

Discussion of Douglas A. Anderson’s revised and expanded edition of The Annotated Hobbit (2002).

Spring Semester, 2003

JANUARY 19, 2003 — THE TWO TOWERS

           Discussion of the movie adaptation of The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers, directed by Peter Jackson.  There have been numerous reviews, articles, and comments on the movie in newspapers, magazines, and websites. See, for example, the January issue of Mythprint for pithy comments pro and con from many Tolkien fans. Michael Wilmington’s review in the Chicago Tribune called the film “A Towering Triumph”; other reviewers have also been enthusiastic, but far from everyone. Just about every magazine that could find an excuse to do so has published an article (e.g., the current issue of Blade has a cover article on commercial replicas of the swords used in the movie).  Jude Fisher’s The Two Towers Visual Companion is now out.  The first book-length study of the director we know of has been published: it’s in Italian: Peter Jackson by Andrea Bordoni and Matteo Marino (Il Castoro Cinema, 2002) (ISBN 88-8033-225-2) (yes, it has a chapter on The Fellowship of the Ring movie).   

FEBRUARY 16, 2003 — QUESTIONS ABOUT TOLKIEN  

            Kristin Thompson has started work on a book on Tolkien and would like our group to help by brainstorming about some textual questions she has.  For example: what the heck is Tom Bombadil doing in this book?  why does Gandalf wait so long to reveal who he is when he returns as the White?  Kristin is preparing a list of such questions, which we’ll send out soon.  Feel free to e-mail replies if you can’t come in person.

MARCH 23, 2003 — OSCARS!

            Our 2nd Oscar party at Kristin’s, assuming (as seems likely enough) that The Two Towers or other F&SF films are among the nominees.

APRIL 13, 2003 — CATHERINE ASARO 

           Some of us will have met SF author Cathering Asaro the week before at Odyssey Con, where she will be one of the guests of honor.  Perhaps by then we’ll have picked a book or two of hers on which to focus (does anyone have any recommendations?), but meanwhile just each read whatever we can find.  Her major books include:

            Primary Inversion (1995)

            Catch the Lightning (1996)

            The Last Hawk (1997)

            The Radiant Seas (1998)

            The Veiled Web (1999)

            The Phoenix Code (2000)

            Ascendant Sun (2000)

            Spherical Harmonic (2001)

            The Quantum Rose (2002)

            Moon Shadow (scheduled for 2003)

            Skyfall (forthcoming, per Books in Print)

MAY 11, 2003 — CAROL EMSHWILLER

            Noted SF author Carol Emshwiller will be one of the guests of honor two weeks later at WisCon.  Our advice on reading is the same as for Catherine Asaro. Her major books include:

            Joy in Our Cause (1974) (short stories)

            Verging on the Pertinent (1989) (short stories)

            The Start of the End Of It All (1990) (short stories)

            Carmen Dog (1990)

            Ledoyt (1995)

            Leaping Man Hill (1998)

            The Mount (2002)

            Report to the Men’s Club & Other Stories (2002)

Gwyneth Jones has a review-essay on the last two titles in the January, 2003 issue of The New York Review of Science Fiction.

JUNE 9, 2003 — THE X-MEN FRANCHISE

            Marvel Comics’ X-Men has a long and very chequered history, and is the series against which sales of other comic books are measured. Does anyone know all of the complicated storyline(s)?  Has the franchise been so successful because of its flexibility? 

Summer, 2003

July 13, 2003 – Favorite Fantasies

            People recommended these books from among those they have read recently:

            Michael Chabon, ed. McSweeney’s Mammoth Treasury of Thrilling Tales (Vintage Books, 2003)

            Jasper Fforde, Lost in a Good Book (Viking, 2003)

            Gregory Maguire, Mirror Mirror (Regan Books, 2003)

            Garth Nix, Mister Monday (Scholastic, 2003)

            Terry Pratchett, Monstrous Regiment (Harper Collins, 2003)

August 17, 2003 – League of Extraordinary Gentlemen

            Discussion of the graphic novel League of Extraordinary Gentlemen by Alan Moore and Kevin O’Neill, and the comic books published so far in the second series.  See also Jess Nevins, Heroes and Monsters: The Unofficial Companion to The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen (Monkey Brain, Inc., 2003).  See also the current movie based on the graphic novel, starring Sean Connery as Alan Quatermain and Peta Wilson as Mina Harker.  There is also a novelization of the movie, written by K.  J.  Anderson (Pocket Star Books, 2003).

September 14, 2003 – Kavalier and Klay

            Discussion of The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Klay (Random House, 2000), a novel by Michael Chabon.

Fall Semester, 2003

OCTOBER 5, 2003 — ANDRE NORTON

             Focus on her diversity (following an essay in the forthcoming anthology Dark Matters II which discusses her use of many ethnicities and cultures throughout her career, from the fifties–when this was not common–up to the present day).  Major critical studies of Norton include Sandra Miesel’s excellent introductions to the Gregg Press editions of Witch World and Sargasso of Space, Carl Yoke’s Roger Zelazny and Andre Norton: Proponents of Individualism (State Library of Ohio, 1979), and Andre Norton: A Primary and Secondary Bibliography by Roger Schlobin and Irene R. Harrison (NESFA Press, 2nd ed., 1994).

NOVEMBER  2, 2003 — NEAL STEPHENSON

            Focus on Snow Crash (1992).  His other novels include Zodiac (1988), Diamond Age (1995), and Cryptonomicon (1999), while with the just-released Quicksilver (2003) he is beginning a massive new series. 

DECEMBER 7, 2003 — TALES BEFORE TOLKIEN

            Discussion of the stories in Tales Before Tolkien: The Roots of Modern Fantasy,  ed. Douglas A. Anderson.  This collection has just been published in trade paperback by Ballantine Books.

Spring Semester, 2004

JANUARY 11, 2004 — RETURN OF THE KING

            Discussion of Peter Jackson’s movie version of Return of the King  (released in December 2003).

FEBRUARY 29, 2004 – THE OSCARS

           Private meeting at a member’s home to watch the telecast of the Academy Awards and root for the Peter Jackson version of Return of the King, which was nominated in eleven categories (and, in the event, won all of them), including best picture, best screenplay adapted from another medium, and best director.

MARCH 28, 2004 — HONOR HARRINGTON

           David Weber will be one of the guests of honor at Odyssey Con (the weekend following this meeting, April 2-4).  Everybody try to read one of the books in Weber’s Honor Harrington series (the character is described as a female Hornblower in space).  The series began with On Basilisk Station (1993) and includes The Honor of the Queen (1993), Field of Dishonor (1994), The Short Victorious War (1994), Flag in Exile (1995), Honor Among Enemies (1996), In Enemy Hands (1997), Echoes of Honor (1998), Ashes of Victory (2000), and War of Honor (2003).  There are also a number of collections of short stories, with contributions by Weber and other authors writing about his fictional world: More Than Honor (1998), Worlds of Honor (1999), Changer of Worlds (2000), and Service of the Sword (2003).         

APRIL 18, 2004 — SONG FOR THE BASILISK 

          Patricia McKillip will be one of the guests of honor at WisCon (Memorial Day weekend, May 28-31). It has been some time since we discussed one of her novels.  Suggested reading: Song for the Basilisk (1998).

MAY 16, 2004 – LYRA’S OXFORD

           Discussion of Lyra’s Oxford (2003) by Philip Pullman, ancillary to the His Dark Materials trilogy.

Summer Semester, 2004

JUNE 20, 2004 — ANGEL IN MEMORIAM

            Joss Whedon created a number of well-regarded television series.  Angel was unexpectedly cancelled after five seasons (October, 1999 to May, 2004).  Some of our group who followed this series will lead us in a discussion of Angel, with perhaps some hindsight on Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Whedon’s earlier series on which the character of Angel, the vampire with a conscience, was introduced.  One can still see re-runs of Angel Monday through Friday on TNT (cable channel 32 in Madison) from 4:00-5:00 p.m., and on the WB network (cable channel 15) from 700-8:00 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday at midnight and 8:00 p.m. Tuesday. 

Reruns of Buffy can be seen on FX (cable channel 55) Monday through Friday from 6:00-8:00 a.m. (two episodes back to back), and on WB on Saturday at 8:00 p.m. and Sunday at noon. (All times CST.)  Many episodes are also available on VHS videocassette and DVD.   

JULY 11, 2004– LEIGH BRACKETT

             As part of our occasional series on older authors, we shall discuss the work of Leigh Brackett (1915-1978).  A prolific author, she wrote hard-boiled mysteries as well as science fiction and fantasy.  Her books are in libraries and used bookstores, and she’s been much anthologized (e.g., Pamela Sargent’s Women of Wonder, Gardner Dozois’s The Good Old Stuff).  She also contributed to screenplays (notably The Empire Strikes Back, The Big Sleep, various Westerns directed by Howard Hawks and starring John Wayne). There is a bibliography of her work in the Reference section of Memorial Library on campus, call number PS 374 S35 A7.  Everybody try to read one or two of her books (whatever you can find) and come share your impressions.

AUGUST 15, 2004 — RETURN TO EARTHSEA

           Ursula K. Le Guin published two more books in her Earthsea series in 2001, Tales from Earthsea and The Other Wind.

Spring Semester, 2005

FEBRUARY 20, 2005 – TOLKIEN’S ILLUSTRATORS

            Discussion of illustrations of the work of J. R. R. Tolkien by the author himself and by numerous other artists.

MARCH 13, 2005 – MILES VORKOSIGAN SERIES

            Discussion of the Miles Vorkosigan series of Lois McMaster Bujold, with emphasis on the Hugo Award-winning novella, “The Mountains of Mourning” (in Young Miles).

APRIL 17, 2005 – TOLKIEN AND THE GREAT WAR

            Discussion of Tolkien and the Great War (2003), John Garth’s study of Tolkien’s military service during World War I and its influence on his fiction.

MAY 15, 2005 – MCKINLEY’S SUNSHINE

            Discussion of Robin McKinley’s vampire novel, Sunshine.

Summer Semester, 2005

JUNE 19, 2005 – RAY BRADBURY

            Discussion of the work of Ray Bradbury with focus on his recent novel, From the Dust Returned: A Family Remembrance (William Morrow, 2001).  The stories range over most of his career from the 1940’s to the present, and show his typical method of gathering a number of shorter pieces to form a novel. The “family” is a fictional one, the Elliots. The dust jacket was illustrated by his friend, Charles Addams.

JULY 17, 2005 – FOUNDATION “TRILOGY”

            Discussion of Isaac Asimov’s Foundation (1951), Foundation and Empire (1952), and Second Foundation (1953). These three books constitute what was long known as “the Foundation trilogy” and won a special Hugo Award in 1966 for best all-time science fiction series.  Asimov later (1982-1993) continued the series, and other authors have added to it subsequently, but we will focus on the early books. (The term “trilogy” is as much a misnomer here as it is for Tolkien’s Lord of the Rings, however. All three books are collections of earlier stories published between 1942 and 1949. There were eight stories: four in the first volume, two in the second, two in the third.  The titles were all changed between their magazine and book appearance. Part 1 of the first volume was written as a prelude to the book edition and is the only part not previously published.)

AUGUST 14, 2005 – SUMMER MOVIES

            Discussion of fantasy movies due for release over the course of summer, 2005: e.g., Batman Begins, Tim Burton’s Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, The Fantastic Four, The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, George Lucas’s Star Wars: The Revenge of the Sith, and Steven Spielberg’s War of the Worlds.

Fall Semester, 2005

SEPTEMBER 11, 2005 – THE LORD OF THE RINGS: THE MAKING OF THE MOVIES

Note this was earlier scheduled for Sept. 18 but has been moved a week ahead.


Kristin Thompson will present part of her forthcoming book on Frodo, Fantasy, and Franchises: The Lord of the Rings and Modern Hollywood (University of California Press).
Kristin will also be doing a presentation on videogames based on The Lord of the Rings movies for the Department of Communication Arts on Thursday, September 22, at 4:00 p.m. in 4070 Vilas Hall.

OCTOBER 9, 2005 –GEORGE MacDONALD

Focus on The Golden Key.

NOVEMBER 13, 2005 — CHARLES WILLIAMS

Focus on The Place of the Lion.

DECEMBER 11, 2005 — TOLKIEN AND RELIGION

There have been a number of books, especially during the last few years, on religious resonances in Tolkien’s work. Examples include:

  • Arthur, Sarah. Walking With Frodo: A Devotional Journey Through The Lord of the Rings (2003)
  • Birzer, Bradley J. J. R. R. Tolkien’s Sanctifying Myth (2002)
  • Bruner, Kurt D. and Jim Ware. Finding God in The Lord of the Rings (2002)
  • Dalton, Russell W. Faith Journey through Fantasy Lands: A Christian Dialogue with Harry Potter, Star Wars and The Lord of the Rings (2003)
  • Garbowski, Christopher. Recovery and Transcendence for the Contemporary Mythmaker: The Spiritual Dimension in the Work of J. R. R. Tolkien (1st ed., 2000; 2nd ed., 2004)
  • Loy, David L. and Linda Goodhew. The Dharma of Dragons and Daemons: Buddhist Themes in Modern Fantasy (2004)
  • Wood, Ralph C. The Gospel According to Tolkien (2003)


And some earlier titles include:

  • Begg, Ean C. M. The Lord of the Rings and the Signs of the Times (1975)
  • Dickerson, Matthew. Following Gandalf: Epic Battles and Moral Victory in The Lord of the Rings (1993)
  • Purtill, Richard L. J. R. R. Tolkien: Myth, Morality, and Religion (1984)
  • Urang, Gunnar. Shadows of Heaven: Religion and Fantasy in the Writing of
  • C. S. Lewis, Charles Williams, and J. R. R. Tolkien (1971)

Also, out-of-town member Matthew Fisher has given permission to read his paper on “Working at the Crossroads: Tolkien, St. Augustine, and the Beowulf Poet” originally given at the Marquette conference last fall.

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